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Did you watch this year’s Academy Awards (Oscars)? If so, you may have seen the debut of Apple’s new iPad moviemaking commercial featuring commentary by Martin Scorsese (see below). This commercial not only features students using iPads to create movies, the entire commercial was actually shot using an iPad!

In 1995, I graduated with a degree in Broadcast Production. At that time, we used to talk about the differences in consumer quality video (the kind we shot with our home VHS camcorders) and broadcast quality video (the kind that came from professional equipment costing upwards of $50k). At the time, only broadcast quality video was suitable for professional broadcast use. How times have changed! With this single commercial, Apple has demonstrated that it is now possible for anyone to create broadcast quality video with the camera found in their iPad or iPhone!

How appropriate, then that The MacSpa is featuring Moviemaking for our March class series? This will be an exciting month! First, we’ve partnered with the Arapahoe Library District’s Smoky Hill and Southglenn Libraries for workshops on how to shoot with your device in a Green Screen studio setting. During these free workshops, we’ll discuss importing footage from iOS devices into iMovie and editing techniques. Next, we’ve partnered with the Voices Women+Film Festival at the Sie Film Center to offer a free workshop on creating movies entirely using your iPad or iPhone (without a computer). For those who want to take your moviemaking to the next level, we’ll be offering Final Cut Pro X classes back at the ‘Spa.

Consumer video and computer technology has come a long over the past 30 years. Do you remember the original Beta and VHS port-a-pack video recorders that came out in the ’80s? Between the tape recording deck, camera and tripod, hauling this load was almost 50 pounds! Editing footage required connecting a second Beta or VHS deck that would record only the portions you wanted to keep. When computer-based non-linear editing was first introduced in the ’90s, it seemed like a godsend. For the first time, only one videotape deck was needed – and video clips could be imported to a computer to be edited as easily as using a word processor! Apple introduced iMovie for Mac in 1999 (when the first Macs with Firewire were released) – allowing full control of connected digital video camcorders. Today, iMovie X is still the best free consumer video editing application with innovations not found on other platforms. iMovie X’s sibling, iMovie for iOS offers many similar  innovations on iPad and iPhone. iMovie X’s big brother, Final Cut Pro X adds many additional features and innovations.

So join us in March to learn about these fantastic new moviemaking technological innovations! We’ll look forward to seeing you in your neighborhood or ours! RSVP for classes here.

-Steve Ohlfest, Mac Mentor & Videographer

 

The MacSpa